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Florida > The Florida Election Code > Presidential Electors; Political Parties; Executive Committees And Members

§ 103.081 Use of party name; political advertising.

Overview of Statute

This statute governs the use of party name and political advertising. It provides an overview of when people can use the name, abbreviation, or symbol of a political party, and the procedures they must go through to be able to use the party name. This statute also governs how political parties file names with the Department of State of groups and committees associated with the parties.

Statute

(1) No person shall use the name, abbreviation, or symbol of any political party, the name, abbreviation, or symbol of which is filed with the Department of State, in political advertising in newspapers, other publications, handbills, radio or television, or any other form of advertising in connection with any political activities in support of a candidate of any other party, unless such person shall first obtain the written permission of the chair of the state executive committee of the party the name, abbreviation, or symbol of which is to be used.

(2) No person or group of persons shall use the name, abbreviation, or symbol of any political party, the name, abbreviation, or symbol of which is filed with the Department of State, in connection with any club, group, association, or organization of any kind unless approval and permission have been given in writing by the state executive committee of such party. This subsection shall not apply to county executive committees of such parties and organizations which are chartered by the national executive committee of the party the name, abbreviation, or symbol of which is to be used, or to organizations using the name of any political party which organizations have been in existence and organized on a statewide basis for a period of 10 years.
(3) A political party may file with the Department of State names of groups or committees associated with the political party. Such filed names may not be used without first obtaining the written permission of the chair of the state executive committee of the party.
(4) Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, an affiliated party committee shall be entitled to use the name, abbreviation, or symbol of the political party of its leader as defined in s. 103.092.

History:

s. 6, ch. 6469, 1913; RGS 304; CGL 360; s. 7, ch. 26870, 1951; s. 26, ch. 29934, 1955; s. 1, ch. 57-202; s. 1, ch. 61-424; s. 3, ch. 67-353; ss. 10, 35, ch. 69-106; s. 32, ch. 77-175; s. 606, ch. 95-147; s. 35, ch. 2007-30; ss. 1, 30, ch. 2011-6; HJR 7105, 2011 Regular Session.

Definition [Person]

An individual or a corporation, association, firm, partnership, joint venture, joint stock company, club, organization, estate, trust, business trust, syndicate, or other combination of individuals having collective capacity. The term includes a political party, affiliated party committee, or political committee. Fla. Stat. § 106.011(14).

Definition [Candidate]

Any person to whom any one or more of the following applies:

(a) Any person who seeks to qualify for nomination or election by means of the petitioning process.
(b) Any person who seeks to qualify for election as a write-in candidate.
(c) Any person who receives contributions or makes expenditures, or gives his or her consent for any other person to receive contributions or make expenditures, with a view to bringing about his or her nomination or election to, or retention in, public office.
(d) Any person who appoints a treasurer and designates a primary depository.
(e) Any person who files qualification papers and subscribes to a candidate’s oath as required by law.
This definition does not include any candidate for a political party executive committee. Fla. Stat. § 97.021(6).

Cases

florida Cases

Case Name: Wagner v. Gray

Citation: 74 So.2d 89

Year: 1954

Case URL: https://www.ravellaw.com/opinions/e775639879250c3a1f0c221b72d589d6?query=74%20So[...]

Case Summary: Wagner v. Gray held in part that the statute requiring a majority vote for the nomination of candidates by political parties for election to public office does not violate the constitutional provision that a plurality of votes is needed for the election of an elected official.

Out-of-State Cases

Federal Cases

Additional Resources

Further Reading

  • Fla. Jur. 2d Elections s 69, Generally

  • Fla. Jur. 2d Elections s 77, Affiliated party committees